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This week our group decided to study digital competence and self-efficacy. After deciding on the topic we decided to (individually) search for information on how to develop and increase our digital competence.

As this is a problem based learning course,  we work by, at first, identifying the problem we want to solve, given a certain framework, and then by finding information and answers to our problem. Finally we decide on how we want to present our group work.  This is a time consuming way of learning. Is this combination of “individual trial and error + group interaction” an efficient way of learning? Maybe no one of us finds the “best” or most workable source of information? Or is the process of learning involving more than just finding the right source of information and finding a way to present it to the other groups? (probably is, I will share it with you when I learn more…)

I have to admit, that in finding interesting links to this week’s topic, I was quite uncertain about my own links. It seems all in the group have years of experience in teaching, and I was concerned, would my suggestions on interesting links be of any interest and were they “academic” enough. To my surprise the group selected, as a framework for our presentation, the information found in one of my links. Maybe I now can feel a little bit more digitally confident…? At least I am glad I could contribute to the solution, even though I could not participate in the meeting.

In my previous task I mentioned that, in this course, I would like to develop my digital literacies ” in practice”. What I meant was, that I would really like to find some new digital tools for online teaching. This week we decided to have our presentation on Topic 1 on a Google Jamboard. I was not the only one who was not familiar with this tool (😊), and while working with it I think we all learnt, at least, the basics of it. If you want to know what a Jamboard is, and if it can support your teaching, look at this video where edtech enthusiast Sam Karywhich gives very good instructions on “How to Use Google Jamboard for Remote Teaching”  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9m4HCjOkcA

Maybe one of the challenges with digital tools is, that the ideal would be to use only a few, versatile tools, that you master well. But how to choose the best ones? How to even get an idea on what tools are available? How to keep track on all new ones? How do you do that?

Gaining more confidence?